wellbeing tip of the month with our mental health worker

March 10, 2020

Hey everyone! Sally here. I am happy to be bringing you my monthly wellbeing blog post. I hope that you will find it helpful and it will inspire you to keep looking after yourself and others.

 

 

This month, I think we can all reflect on how we can check up on each other to ensure no one is going through a crisis alone - our peers, family, friends and colleagues are all people around us that we can be looking out for.

 

Following the recent suicide of celebrity Caroline Flack, it has prompted me to think about how important it is to check on our nearest and dearest and simply see if they are okay. And let’s not forget those people who always seem fine, the ones who are laughing and joking all the time...we should check on them too.

 

From my experience working in mental health, I have seen firsthand the impact that being there to talk with someone who is struggling in their life has on them. How it undoubtedly helps them, even just knowing that someone is there. They may or may not want to talk but knowing that someone is around, if or when they are ready to talk, can mean everything. Though we know some mental health illness needs professional support, we can still be there for one another and help boost each other's day-to-day mental wellbeing.

 

Many of us feel that we are ‘not qualified’ or ‘don’t have the skills' to speak with someone about their problems. But, just listening to someone, without judgments or having to provide solutions can really make all the difference. It might be asking a straight forward question, like: ‘are you okay mate?’ followed by ‘is there anything I can do?’

 

Over the last few weeks, on all social media platforms, there has been a post that has been circulating.

 

 

 

This was also previously posted by Caroline Flack on Instagram in November. What is particularly pertinent is that, although this can mean many things to different people, the clear implication is an encouragement to just be good to each other and look out for one another. What’s more, studies have shown that being kind to others actually has a knock-on effect and is good for our health. Helping others makes us feel good and gives us a sense of purpose. So let’s give this a go!

 

Here are 3 simple things you could say that may help:

  1. Are you okay/alright/how are you doing?

  2. Is there anything I can do?

  3. I’m around if you need me.

Thanks for reading and see you next month!

 

This content is general information only, not advice. If you or someone you know is struggling with a mental health issue, please contact a mental health professional. 

 

 

 

 

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